Great Expectations – starring the horse

Albert and John Mills, make sure that the horse doesn’t run off. Photos from Albert Sheard, no reproduction without permission

The horse is led across the car park to Studio A

Blacksmith’s set for Great Expectations in Studio A

The horse’s starring role

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These photographs are from the 1981, BBC1 serial of Great Expectations. They show the lengths that were taken with Studio drama to recreate authentic looking sets.

Thanks to Albert Sheard for sharing the photographs.

Great Expectations – Camera Break

Photo by Albert Sheard, no reproduction without permission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A camera break in Studio A, during the recording of the 1981 adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations. It was a twelve part series, hosted at Pebble Mill. It was transmitted on Sundays, early evening.

The producer was Barry Letts, the director Julian Amyes, production designer was Michael Edwards, the script editor Terrance Dicks, and the make-up designer Gwen Arthy.

Thanks to Albert Sheard for sharing the photograph.

Pickwick Papers

John Rees on Pickwick Papers. Photograph by Albert Sheard, no reproduction without permission

Pickwick Papers, Phil Hawkins, Frank Manning, Kevin Priestly, John Rees, photo by Albert Sheard, no reproduction without permission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Albert Sheard for sharing these photos from the 1985 adaptation of Dickens’s Pickwick Papers. The location was in Ludlow, Shropshire. Here is the entry from the Radio Times, courtesy of the BBC Genome project:

Synopsis:

by Charles Dickens dramatised in 12 episodes by Jack Davies
starring Nigel Stock as Mr Pickwick with Clive Swift as Mr Tupman, Jeremy Nicholas as Mr Winkle, Alan Parnaby as Mr Snodgrass and Colin Douglas as Mr Wardle, Patrick Malahide as Mr Jingle
Charles Dickens was still only 24 when, in his own words, “I thought of Mr Pickwick…”
The Pickwick Papers soon became a national craze. Mr Pickwick, his friends Tupman, Winkle and Snodgrass, and his cockney servant the immortal Sam Weller, have been among the most popular characters in fiction ever since.
This week they begin their travels through the England of stage-coaches and coaching inns – in a new version of Dickens’s first and most-loved bestseller.
(Nigel Stock visits “Pebble Mill at One” tomorrow)

Contributors
Author: Charles Dickens
Dramatised by: Jack Davies
Music composed and conducted by: Carl Davis
Lighting Director: Bob Chaplin
Script Editor: Terrance Dicks
Designer: Myles Lang
Producer: Barry Letts
Director: Brian Lighthill
Narrator: Ray Brooks
Mr Pickwick: Nigel Stock
Mr Tupman: Clive Swift
Mr Winkle: Jeremy Nicholas
Mr Snodgrass: Alan Parnaby
Sam Weller: Jack Davies
Mr Wardle: Colin Douglas
Mr Jingle: Patrick Malahide
Mrs Bardell: Jo Kendall
Cab driver: Barry Linehan
Waiter (Bull Inn): Russell Denton
Doorman: Michael Godley
Mrs Budger: Mary Maxted
Dr Slammer: Gerald James
Lt Tappleton: John Patrick
Boots: Peter Richards

Sophia and Constance photos by Albert Sheard

Photos by Albert Sheard, no reproduction without permission

These photos are from the 1988 six part drama series Sophia and Constance. The location is the Black Country Museum.

Thanks to Albert Sheard for sharing them.


Sophia and Constance at Black Country Museum

Photos from Dawn and Kevin Hudson, no reproduction without permission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These photos show the crew and crafts people setting up for the shooting of the 1988 six part drama series: Sophia and Constance at the Black Country Museum. The series was recorded on the outside broadcast truck CM3.

Thanks for Dawn and Kevin Hudson for sharing the photos.

The following comment was left on the Pebble Mill Facebook page:

Albert Sheard: ‘Second photo, left to right Stan Morgan/ Kevin Lakin /Frank Crow in the cap / Dave Bushall aka Gonzo /Kevin Hudson / and Peter Potter kneeling. All great lads, 3 of them no longer with us.’