Countryfile – John Craven in the bath

Countryfile 03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

Still of presenter John Craven in the bath, during a Countryfile item.

Does anybody know what the item was? Please add a comment if you can add any information.

Thanks to Ian Collins for making the still available.

The following comments were left on the Pebble Mill Facebook Page:

Andrea Buffery: ‘I think it was a compilation programme directed by Joanna Brame. JC is wearing my snorkel mask.’

Andrew Chorlton: ‘I’m sure that was me on sound. Probably Foster, B or Evans, D on camera. A long time ago!’

Garry Jordan: ‘COUNTRY FILE, Transmission date: 14 May 1989, Clip #: BBC_253004’

Betti Moretti: ‘Can’t help with the story sorry… but when I worked on The Countryside Hour, the most mortifying thing would occur every Thursday… when I was little, Mum would hoover when Newsround came on – white noise? And I’d immediately drop off on the sofa… every Thursday, John would rehearse his script for Countryfile in my room… and you would not believe the struggle I had to keep my eyes open! Thank god for the Club & Mick Murphy! Happy days!

Rosalind Gower: ‘I directed one on lavender growing for essential oils in Norfolk which ended with John in a bath, but I don’t recognise the bathroom or the duck and snorkel! On my shoot we did this as a last minute idea and asked one of the farm workers if we could borrow their cottage bathroom for a short time. When she saw it was for the famous John Craven she readily agreed. To save John’s modesty we asked if she had any bubble bath…no…so we used washing up liquid instead but had to use loads of it to make any sort of decent bubbles. By then the hot water had run out so poor JC has to do his PTC in gloopy lukewarm water, trying not to shiver and pretending he was having a luxuriously scented relaxing bath. What a trooper! When we’d finished the woman asked for John’s autograph as she thought otherwise none of her friends would believe she’d had John Craven in her bath that afternoon!’

Countryfile Titles

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Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

This is a titles’ grab from Countryfile, BBC1’s Sunday rural affairs magazine show, presented by John Craven.

Thanks to VT Editor, Ian Collins for sharing the grab.

Countryfile

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Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

This is a grab from the title sequence of Countryfile, it probably dates from the early 1990s, when the weekly rural affairs magazine show went out on a Sunday morning.

Thanks to Ian Collins for making the grab available.

The following comment was left on the Pebble Mill Facebook page:

Tim Manning: ‘Carl Booth was the designer, and I seem to recall they were from the mid-90s.’

Countryfile with Rupert Segar

Rupert Segar with rabid fox caught in Nancy. Countryfile 1990. Mick Murphy dir. CW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Charles White, no reproduction without permission.

(The photo is of Countryfile presenter, Rupert Segar, from 1990. The story was about a rabid fox caught in Nancy, France.)

I was on attachment to CountryFile as a director from my editing job, and went upstairs to start day 1. Mike Fitzgerald, the then Series Producer asked me if i had a passport and i was duly dispatched to France. With Michael Murphy as my mentor, we turned up in Nancy looking for rabies. At this time the Chunnel was about to complete and the big fear (unfounded) was that rabid foxes would walk through to Britain. (The fact that bats fly here with it wasn’t overlooked, but not explored). Nancy at this period was the epicentre of Rabies on the continent, and we filmed without luck in the surrounding forests. By pure chance as we were at the Laboratoires de La Rage, a rabid fox got trapped in a tennis court and was duly brought to us. The picture shows Rupert doing a PTC (Piece to Camera) in front of the wretched creature. (They were tested and then subsequently killed with cyanide)- the fox, not Rupert!

Of further interest is the crew size; Director, Presenter, PA, Lighting man, Sound, and Cameraman – what luxury! CountryFile had in its office 4 teams of Director, Producer, researcher and PA, who operated a 4 week rota of making items for the programme; this model worked very well. Researchers could take days out to recce the countryside for stories, and then a suitable crew would be designated for the job.

On another Fox story with Michael Collie, in the far north of Scotland, I directed for 3 days an item about a moratorium on shooting foxes which had been running for three years. Great theory and lots of interviews about predation of sheep etc; as the sun went down on us and Michael did his final PTC, a farmer came up to us in his land rover and confessed he’d been shooting foxes during the whole experimental time. Back to the drawing board….!!!

Charles White

Mick Murphy added the following comment on the Pebble Mill Facebook group: ‘Charles is spot on. He was also selected for his impeccable French. The story went on to Northallerton, North Yorkshire, for a demonstration, by local Trading Standards of their rabies containment strategy, using a very reluctant labrador, acting as an infected dog. Those were the days when CountryFile featured single items. It was also Rupert’s debut.’

 

Farming sig tune & Radio Birmingham jingles

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

Here is the BBC Farming signature tune, from the early 1980s. Farming was the predecessor of the current Countryfile series.

Also included here are some Radio Birmingham jingles, which probably date from the 1970s.

Thanks to Peter Poole for sharing these.

BBC Radio Birmingham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following comments were left on the Pebble Mill Facebook group:

Stuart Gandy: ‘Flippin, ek! that recalls memories from a long time ago, from 1980 when I was doing racks in Studio B. The racks job for Farming was usually very simple. Apart from the opening introduction to camera and the goodbyes, almost all of the rest of the programme was on film. It was the telecine operator who had the much more to do, from the ops perspective.’

Lynn Cullimore: ‘Music always evokes memories…the Top Gear sig tune does it for me having worked there…it gives me goose bumps.’

Pete Simpkin: ‘Actually Lynn the Radio sig. tune version of the Farming programme always does that for me, I can still hear David Stevens announcing and then the strains of ‘I wish I were plough-boy’ took us into Tony Parkin’s introduction.’

Peter Poole: ‘I used to work on Farming with Peter Mellors. After a few weeks he asked if I would like to mix the programme . In my excitement I almost forgot to mic up the presenter. This was probably my first live TV programme. Great days.’