Pebble Mill at Ten

Copyright resides with the original holder.

This is the ten year anniversary show of Pebble Mill at One, from 1982. It features the landing of the Harrier, amongst other memorable items. Some, like the ‘Black and White Minstrels’ are very much of their time, and seem quite shocking when viewed today. It is presented by Marian Foster, Donny Mcleod and Bob Langley.

Screen grab of the opening titles. Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

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Pebble Mill at One book

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission

 

 

 

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Thanks to cameraman Robin Sunderland for sharing his copy of this 1980’s Pebble Mill at One book. The front cover features presenters, Marian Foster, Bob Langley and Paul Coia, stood outside BBC Pebble Mill, whilst the back cover shows Marian in front of the Pebble Mill Heritage Tapestry, ‘Count Your Blessings’. The tapestry was very large, and was hung at one time in Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, although I remember it adorning one wall of the courtyard corridor outside Studio A at Pebble Mill in the 1990s.

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Pebble Mill at One Reunion 2012

PM@1 Reunion 1 Roy Thompson

PM@1 Reunion 2 Roy Thompson

PM@1 Reunion 3 Roy Thompson

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

This article by Peter Seabrook about a Pebble Mill at One presenters’ reunion, remembering 40 years since the start of series, was published in the Sun on 27th October 2012. Peter Seabrook is the Sun’s resident gardening expert.

Thanks to Roy Thompson for sharing the article.

The following comment was left on the Pebble Mill Facebook page:

Keith Brook (aka Scouse):

‘Seeweed, who I still call a doddery old fart every time I see him, was a wonderful, kind and professional presenter.

He knew that rehearsals were often non-existent, so he’d tip me off about what needed close-ups seconds after I arrived with the camera for his live piece’

Pebble Mill Tapestry

In 1984 Marian Foster and Kaffe Fassett oversaw the Heritage Tapestry, which was made up of 6″x 6″ squares sent in by viewers of Pebble Mill at One. The tapestry was quite eclectic with each square having a different subject, colour, style etc. Apparently at least 2,000 viewers contributed to the tapestry. Sewing the tapestry together must have been a big job. It was displayed a a number of exhibitions, but housed at Chatsworth House in Derbyshire. It left Chatsworth in May 1993. I remember the tapestry hanging in the corridor overlooking the courtyard at Pebble Mill, which ran along the side of Studio A.

I cannot find a photograph of the tapestry, and I don’t know what happened to it when the building closed in 2004. Please add a comment, if you know any more about the tapestry, or what happened to it.

the tapestry used to hang in the corridor to the left hand-side of this photograph

The tapestry used to hang in the corridor to the left hand-side of this photograph. Photo by Philip Morgan

Pebble Mill at One at Legoland

Legoland1 Legoland2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo copyright Roger Guest, no reproduction without permission.

These photos were taken at Legoland in Copenhagen. It was part of a Pebble Mill at One programme recorded in April – May 1983.
The team all travelled in a Patterson’s coach and included Steve Weddell, John Smith, Jane McLean, Marian Foster, Jack Rook, Mary Clyne, Mike Bloore, Dave Baumber, and myself.
The following comments were left on the Pebble Mill Facebook page:
Keith Brook (Scouse): ‘Mike Bloore is trying to figure out which end is which of the videotape!! The recorder was called a VR3000 if I remember rightly.
Ian Dewar and myself started that operation.’

Ray Lee: ‘Yes it was an Ampex VR3000 and had large rechargable batteries which might last for one tape if you were lucky. It produced a very basic monochrome playback, which really did little other than indicate something was on the tape. It was very noisy, as the head assembly was mounted on ball bearings, unlike the airbearings that were used in all the full size machines. Little chance of assessing sound quality, but maybe that was recorded separately on a timecode linked tape machine. I don’t know details of how it was used in the field, but did have to attempt to repair it a few times. ! Very quicly replaced by the VPR10 1″ machine for these type of productions.’

Jane Clement: ‘I seem to recall they went to Freetown Christiania as part of the trip – the big hippie commune in Copenhagen – is that right Steve N Weddle and Jane Mclean?’

Jane Mclean: ‘Oh just look at us Mike Bloore! Yes Jane, we did indeed and I was petrified. They had lots of huge dodgy dogs. I went for a wee under a bush and two dogs charged me midst flow. The owner stopped them just before they reached me by which time I was wrecked. Ian Dewar had to give me medicine from his hip flask.’

Steve Weddle: ‘Heavens yes, Christiania, the hippy commune right in the heart of Copenhagen which proclaimed itself a free state. As I was the nearest thing we had to a hippy – long hair and a duffle coat – I went in to hold discussions with their leaders to see if they would allow us to film in their break away state. They eventually agreed, giving me a promise that our safety was assured. As if! No sooner had we started filming than we were greeted by a break away faction brandishing sticks and bricks, demanding our immediate departure from the site, or else. A tense few minutes ensued until my contact there won the day and we were allowed to carry on filming. And good on John Smith for holding his nerve. Plus I do remember that incident of the dog in the daytime, Jane. I seem to recall the Danes having a weird thing for Alsatians. But that’s for another time!’