Bish Mehay by Paresh Solanki

Editors may come and go, but Bish Mehay was always there to anchor the ship (the BBC Asian Programmes Unit). He was a great friend and a great support, especially in time of crisis. His motto ‘Don’t worry, it is all under control,’ was a Bish classic from the numerous phrases he utilised daily. His knowledge of Bollywood stars and ethnic fashion models was phenomenal. If smartphones were around at his time at the APU, Bish would have been photographed with every Bollywood star and fashion model around. He loved directing the super stars. During the time of Mega Mela at the NEC, he had the audacity to tell Sharukh Khan how to pose for a shot. His anecdotes would fill a book. What a loss – RIP to one of the pioneers of ethnic broadcasting in the UK.

Paresh Solanki

Pebble Mill site 2020

Pebble Mill site 2020

Posted by Bhasker Solanki on Thursday, 9 January 2020

Thanks to Bhasker Solanki for sharing this video of the Pebble Mill site in Jan 2020. It looks very different from when it was a broadcast centre, with only the road past Security at the end of the video looking the same.

Copyright Bhasker Solanki, no reproduction without permission

Geoffrey Green

1974 Midlands Today screen grab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a 1974 BBC1 screen-grab of one of the original Midlands Today journalists Geoffrey Green – reporting on how transplant surgeons removed a Birmingham man’s kidney not realising he was still alive. Green, who was from Coventry, did his first BBC broadcast on radio in 1950. He died in 2003. Thanks to Andrew Hewkin for sharing this.

The following comments were left on the Pebble Mill Facebook page:

Colin Pierpoint: ‘I remember Geoffrey, we occasionally had a chat in the corridor, and I am sure I worked with him editing his radio 4, and earlier Midland Home Service reports at Pebble Mill and Broad Street. A nice man. Never self important, but a friendly colleague with a laugh and a smile. I remember him laughing at the funny notice in the PM lift about one of our managers. I also came across him on the end of the line with a COOBE doing football reports. Always cooperative. In Broad Street Control Room we used to ring down the line to see if anyone had arrived, and every time Geoffery Green had just put the headphones on, we heard “You rotten bastards!” come down the music line. But always in a light hearted way, and we would all have a laugh about it.’

Pete Smith (former Midlands Today cameraman): ‘Worked with him many times.. a proper gent, lovely man.’

Wendy Edwards: ‘Gronker! Legend of the Newsroom.’

David Lowe: ‘“Hello Flower” was always the greeting I got from him.’

Conal O’Donnell: ‘Geoffrey “Gronker” Green was a great character and a thoroughly professional journalist. He earned his nickname “Gronker” doing live two ways into both radio and tv programmes when he’d ask the producer “how long do you want me to gronk on about this” If it was 45secs that is what you got -neither more nor less. During the 60s & 70s Geoffrey used to vie for airtime with Peter Colbourne over the polonged death throes of BMC/British Leyland/ BL/Rover in all its various guises.I do not recall the kidney story but Geoff turned out high quality accurate material for decade after decade. His live commentary of the RAF helicopter delicately putting in place the metal spire atop Coventry Cathedral was to me especially memorable.Geoffrey was a portly chap who never took himself too seriously. During one hilarious medieval battle re-enactment piece for Midlands Today he could be seen huffing and puffing across “the field of battle” every inch a modern re-incarnation of Shakespeare’s Falstaff. Geoff joined a Coventry news agency as soon as he left school, acting as a runner during the infamous blitz of 1940. I met Geoff occasionally for a drink at the Durham Ox, Shrewly, after his retirement.

House Services Engineers circa 1983

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Richard Smith for sharing this photo of the House Service Engineers, who had just set up the marquee for Regional Clubs Day. It’s circa 1983.

From L to R: Dave Tansey, Mick Taylor, Dick Smith and Mick Archbold.

Ron Poston working at the BBC Club

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Jan Poston, for sharing this photo from the late 1990s, of her father working at the BBC Club at Pebble Mill.

Ron was a true gentleman and is fondly remembered by BBC staff. He also worked as a studio attendant.