Dawn Wigley (Robertson)

Dawn Wigley (Robertson), a member of Pebble Mill’s Drama Department for many years, died on Saturday 3rd December 2016, following a brave battle in recent years, against serious health problems.

Dawn, then Production Manager, met Tony Wigley on an OB drama shoot in the North East. They married and settled in Cleeve Prior, Worcs.

Dawn moved to Birmingham Drama as a Production Manager, later becoming Drama Organiser.
Tony predeceased her in Autumn 2015.

The cremation will be private, but a reception for former colleagues will take place at the King’s Arms in Cleeve Prior on a date to be announced.

(Thanks to Annie Gumbley-Williams for sharing this news about Dawn.)

Tony Wigley, photo from Bill Bohanna, no reproduction without permission.

David Rudkin talking about the origins of Artemis 81

Origins of Artemis 81 from pebblemill on Vimeo.

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Specially recorded interview with writer David Rudkin talking about how the drama ‘Artemis 81’ came about. ‘Artemis 81’ was transmitted in 1981, when producer David Rose still headed up the English Regions Drama Department. The drama was a three hour epic about the battle of good and evil, starring Hywell Bennett and Sting. Alastair Reid was the director, Dawn Robertson the associate producer, Jenny Brewer the PA, Roger Gregory the script editor, Ian Churchill the camera operator, Bob Jacobs and William Hartley were the production managers, and Mick Murphy was the AFM.

Live from Pebble Mill – Cargo Kings

Copyright resides with the original holder, probably Willoughby Gullachsen; no reproduction without permission. Thanks to Janice Rider for making the photographs available.

‘Cargo Kings’ was a live play produced at Pebble Mill in 1983 in Studio A, when Robin Midgley was Head of Drama.

The BFI Database describes the storyline thus:

‘Roger Savage, an anthropologist, visits at remote island, where the natives, Mambu, Baku and Abode learn about an obscure cargo cult from him. Soon they are in London putting Savages ideas into practice.’ http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/sift/title/161953

The script was written by Stephen Davies, directed by Donald McWhinnie, Dawn Robertson was the production associate, with Will Hartley the production manager.  Roger Gregory was the script editor.  Ian Ashurst was the production designer, with Janice Rider the costume designer and Carol Ganniclifft the make up designer.  Bob Hubbard was the camera supervisor, lighting was by Barry  Hill, and Annette Martin was the vision mixer.

The play starred Jeffrey Kissoon as Baku, Norman Beaton as Mambu, Michael Cochrane as Roger Savage, Christopher Asante as Obode and Ray Smith as Chief Inspector Beltrap.

Nuts in May title cards from Oliver White

Copyright resides with the original holder, no reproduction without permission.

These stills are of the original title cards for the 1976 Pebble Mill, Play for Today, ‘Nuts in Play’. The title cards are hand painted on individual sheets of acetate. They have been kept safe by Film Editor, Oliver White.

Mike Leigh was asked by Producer, David Rose, to set a television drama in his home county of Dorset. Mike then wrote and directed ‘Nuts in Play’, which starred Roger Sloman as Keith and Alison Steadman as Candice-Marie.  Keith and Candice-Marie are a politically correct home counties couple on a camping holiday in Dorset.  They have a frustrating encounter with a Brummie motorcycling couple whose loud music and uncivilised behaviour offend them.

Mike Williams was the cameraman, John Gilbert the sound recordist, and Dave Baumber the dubbing mixer.  The costume designer was Gini Hardy, make-up was by Gwen Arthy, the production designer was David Crozier.  The production unit manager was Dawn Robertson, with production assistants Cyril Gates and Gerard Patterson.

Thanks to Oliver White for making the title cards available.

Dawn Trotman (nee Mears) left the following comment about ‘Nuts in May’: ‘Just such a wonderful and very funny film. Pebble Mill at its height, and Oliver White a brilliant editor. He taught so many of us lowly assistants our craft. Who will teach the Tech ops, as they are called, now? There is no training.’

Pity in History – photos by Willoughby Gullachsen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by Willoughby Gullachsen, no reproduction without permission.

Pity in History was part of the 1985 ‘Summer Season’ of dramas, it went out on 4th July.  It was produced at Pebble Mill by Chris Parr, the executive producer was Robin Midgley and  Sarah Pia Anderson the director.  The play was performed in Studio A.

The play by Howard Barker starred Norman Rodway, Anna Massey, Alan Rickman, Patrick Malahide and Ian McDiarmid.

Set in the Civil War, the story is about a sculptor working to finish a memorial to the Royalist years, as Cromwell’s men break down the surrounding cathedral walls.

The first photo has Alec Robson (TM1) on the left, setting lights and a back view of Keith Schofield with camera; the photo of the rehearsal featuring the crew includes: camera supervisor Dave Doogood, P.A. Bobbie Chapman, Dawn Robertson, cameraman Keith Schofield (crouched), Kevin Heffernan (design), Chris Parr (prod on left), George Allen (TM2) is in the centre with the dark sweater, on his right is cameraman Doug Smith.

John Greening comments: “Gareth Williams is b/g in white trousers. I was AFM and the rehearsals were at Five Ways in an empty office block. Actor in f/g is Roger Frost, husband of Pam Ferris. Howard Barker wrote the play as a vehicle for Ian McDiarmid – he was at the RSC at the time and I had to play his part during rehearsals when there was a matinee..”

Thanks to Dave Bushell, David Short and John Greening for adding to the information.

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Pity in History rehearsalSave