Aimee – photos by Willoughby Gullachsen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by Willoughby Gullachsen, no reproduction without permission.

Aimee was a Screen 2 drama on BBC 2 which went out in 1990.  It was written by Guy Hibbert, produced by Michael Wearing and directed by Pedr James.

Frank Summers, played by Donald Sumpter, apparently kills his mother as an act of mercy, but he won’t say what actually happened.  Aimee also starred Juliet Stevenson, Simon Chandler, Christine Rose and Jeremy Clyde.

Aimee won the Prix SACD award for Best Screenplay at Cannes Television Festival 1992, and was nominated for the Writers’ Guild award for Best Single Drama 1991, and for RTS award for Best Single Drama 1991.

 

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Days at the Beach – photos by Willoughby Gullachsen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by Willoughby Gullachsen, no reproduction without permission.

‘Days at the Beach’ was a BBC 2 Playhouse drama transmitted in 1981.  It was produced by David Rose at BBC Pebble Mill, and written and directed by Malcolm Mowbray.  It was filmed on location in Wales.  Set in 1920, the story follows three soldiers: Sergeant Major Globe, Corporal Mumford and Private Tobe as they guard an unexploded mine washed up on the beach.

The film was edited by Chris Rowlands and Bob Jacobs was the location manager, and John Kenway the Director of Photography.

It starred Mark Aspinall as Private Tobe, Sam Kelly as Sergeant Major McGlobe, Stephen Wale as Corporal Mumford and Julie Walters as Mrs Morgan.

 

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The Heart of the Country 1987

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Willoughby Gullachsen and others, no reproduction without permission.

The ‘Heart of the Country’ was a four part series by Fay Weldon set in Somerset which was broadcast in spring 1987.  It was produced at Pebble Mill by Roger Gregory and directed by Brian Farnham and starred Jacqueline Tong as Sonia, a mother struggling on her own with two young children.  The cast also included Christian Bale.  The climax of the series comes at the Glastonbury Carnival (shown in the last photo), with a fire and the death of one of the characters. Bob Jacobs was 1st A.D., Dave Doogood was the DOP, with Dave Evans assisting (shown in the photo with the paddling pool) and Chris Reynolds did special effects.Save

Nice Work – photos by Willougby Gullachsen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by Willoughby Gullachsen, no reproduction without permission.

Nice Work was produced at Pebble Mill in 1989 by Chris Parr.  David Lodge wrote both the original novel and the screenplay.  The series starred Warren Clarke as Vic Wilcox, the managing director of a ‘Rummidge’ engineering firm, and Haydn Gwynne who played Robyn Penrose a young university academic.  It was filmed on location around Birmingham and the Black Country, including Birmingham University (where David Lodge was a Professor).  Vic and Robyn are thrust together on a business/academic scheme where Robyn was told by her Head of Department to shadow Vic.  After an initial reluctance they come to a mutual respect and friendship, especially when Robyn prevents Vic being tricked by a German engineering company.  Janet Dale played Vic’s wife, Marjorie.

The series was directed by Christopher Menaul, designed by Ian Ashurst, with Paul Woolston as the DoP.  Will Hartley was the 1st AD.

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Ice Dance – photo by Willoughby Gullachsen

Photo by Willoughby Gullachsen (Gus), no reproduction without permission.

Ice Dance was a ‘Screen Two’ drama which went out in March 1989.  It was written by Stephen Lowe, directed by Alan Dosser and produced by Michael Wearing. The drama starred Warren Clarke, Joanne Allen, Andrew Fletcher, Amanda Worthington and Helena McCarthy. It followed the story of a pair of young skaters from Nottingham, whose dream was to emulate Torvill and Dean.

This photo features cameramen Keith Froggatt and Steve Saunderson on the crane, and 1st AD, Will Hartley on the left under the crane.